Dave King, left, Linda King, right, son and daughter of Frank King, wearing 1988 Calgary Olympic jackets react to the results of a plebiscite on whether the city should proceed with a bid for the 2026 Winter Olympics, in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

Dave King, left, Linda King, right, son and daughter of Frank King, wearing 1988 Calgary Olympic jackets react to the results of a plebiscite on whether the city should proceed with a bid for the 2026 Winter Olympics, in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

What now for Calgary, Canada and Olympic Games after 2026 rejection?

Calgary, along with the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver and Whistler, B.C., made Canada a player in the international sport community

Calgary will redefine its reputation as a winter sport powerhouse in the aftermath of a vote rejecting a bid for the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

In a city where recreational, domestic and international athletes ski, board and skate in the legacy venues from the 1988 Winter Olympics, the results of a plebiscite indicated that distinction doesn’t warrant bidding for another games.

In the non-binding plebiscite, just under 40 per cent of eligible voters cast a ballot, and 56 per cent cast a dissenting one.

A Calgary city council that was nervous and divided over bidding is expected to scuttle it Monday.

Calgary, along with the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver and Whistler, B.C., made Canada a player in the international sport community.

If a city synonymous with a successful games legacy doesn’t want to them again, what Canadian city ever will?

“Sport in a positive sense really brings a country together,” Canadian Olympic Committee president Tricia Smith said Wednesday. “I think it’s just a part of us, our humanity. So I suspect we will see another bid from Canada.”

But the chair of Calgary’s bid corporation doesn’t think the city should immediately shift its focus to chasing the 2030 Winter Games. Scott Hutcheson says the city needs to decompress and re-assess.

“I don’t think its 2030,” Hutcheson said. “I think you’ve got to put your pencil down for seven years. You don’t put it down for three years.

“Use the work later, but you can’t put a city through this every four years. My view would be let it go, accept the result, move on and come back with a bid maybe in seven years.”

READ MORE: Olympic and Paralympic committees disappointed, but respectful of Calgary’s vote

Yves Hamelin relocated from Quebec, where he was head of the national short-track speedskating team, to Calgary in 2014 to oversee the Olympic Oval. His son Charles is a three-time gold medallist in short-track.

A sport system that would have been shaped by a home games on the horizon now must adjust expectations and plans, he said.

“For a while, there’s definitely going to be an impact,” Hamelin said. “Will this remove our appetite to do what’s right, to support our community, support youth and the athletes that come out of this sport development? The motivation will always stay.

“We will always keep our eyes on making the sport system as best we can with what we have to do that. The games were just a tool, a leverage to really give an edge to our system. We’re going to have to be more creative I would say.”

Looking at Calgary through a sport lens, it is a city of facilities more than three decades old.

WATCH: Calgarians say no to 2026 Olympic bid

While a new stadium and NHL arena weren’t part of the proposed draft plan, McMahon Stadium and the Saddledome were promised an overhaul.

A $500-million renewal of Calgary’s ‘88 legacies was one piece of a proposed bid.

The other was economic revitalization of a city that has a commercial vacancy rate of 25 per cent in a province that desperately wants pipelines built to the coast to get a competitive price for its oil.

Calgary was one of many North American cities that made a pitch for Amazon’s second headquarters, but didn’t make the shortlist.

Calgary 2026’s proposed draft plan asked Calgarians to put in $390 million and said $4.4 billion would come back to the city if it won the games.

Kyle Shewfelt, an Olympic gold medallist in gymnasitcs at the 2004 Athens Games, is a business owner in Calgary operating his own gymnastics centre.

For him, sport ranked second behind the economy when it came to what he thought a Winter Games would do for the city.

“My question now is, if 56 per cent of Calgarians didn’t want this, what do they want?” he asked. “This was about a catalyst for our city to move forward.

“We’re in a place right now where we’re boom and bust because of oil and gas and that’s all we wait for. I want to diversity this economy. I want us to pursue a big challenge. I want to be a part of that.”

The International Olympic Committee is left with two of the three cities it invited to be candidates for 2026: Stockhom and Milan-Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy.

IOC executive Christophe Dubi visited Calgary multiple times touting a low-risk, high-reward scenario should Calgary get the games.

The IOC, like Calgary 2026, did not convince the majority of voters Tuesday.

“It comes as no surprise following the political discussions and uncertainties right up until the last few days,” the IOC said in a statement.

“It is disappointing that the arguments about the sporting, social and long-term benefits of hosting the Olympic Games did not sway the vote.”

— With files from Canadian Press sports reporter Gregory Strong.

Donna Spencer, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Kimberley Search and Rescue were able to quickly respond to a call for service and transport an injured mountain biker to East Kootenay Regional Hospital over the weekend. Kimberley SAR file photo.
Kimberley Search and Rescue respond to injured mountain biker on Bootleg Mountain

Kimberley Search and Rescue responded to a call for service this past… Continue reading

FILE – Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, takes part in an event on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, July 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Indigenous Peoples Day must be a ‘call to action’, says Assembly of First Nations chief

Discovery of children at Kamloops residential school site must lead to change, Perry Bellegarde says

City of Cranbrook, Ktunaxa Nation to host flag ceremony on National Indigenous Peoples Day. (Corey Bullock file)
City of Cranbrook, Ktunaxa Nation hosting flag ceremony on National Indigenous Peoples Day

A temporary road closure and speed limit reduction will be in effect during the ceremony

A tent housing a mobile vaccination clinic. (Interior Health/Contributed)
Over 5K jabbed at Interior Health mobile COVID-19 vaccine clinics

The clinics have made stops in more than 40 communities since launching last week

Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry talks about B.C.’s plan to restart the province during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, Tuesday, May 25, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Interior Health COVID-19 cases falling slower than the rest of B.C.

More than a third of provincial cases announced Thursday came from the Interior

Cranbrook Arts has opened the doors of their  new gallery space to the public with their inaugural exhibit, Kootenay’s Best.
‘Kootenay’s Best’ opens Cranbrook Arts’ new gallery

This exhibit has been in the works for the past several months and features the work of more than 50 emerging and established artists from across the Kootenays

An example of the timber blowdown that let to the logging at Mountain Station. Photo: Anderson Creek Timber
Timber company logging near Nelson raises local concerns

Anderson Creek Timber owns 600 hectares of forest adjacent to the city

The Sacred Hearts church on PIB land burned Monday morning. (Theresa May Jack/Facebook)
Two churches on First Nation land in South Okanagan burn to the ground

Sacred Hearts church on Penticton Indian Band land was reduced to rubble

Tl’etinqox-lead ceremony at the site of the former St. Joseph’s Mission in Williams Lake, B.C., June 18, 2021. (Angie Mindus photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
‘We are all one people’: Honouring residential school victims and survivors

Love, support and curiousity: Canadians urged to learn about residential schools and their impact

Indigenous rights and climate activists gathered outside Liberty Mutual’s office in Vancouver to pressure the insurance giant to stop covering Trans Mountain. (Photo by Andrew Larigakis)
Activists work to ensure Trans Mountain won’t get insurance

Global campaign urging insurance providers to stay away from Canadian pipeline project

In the first election with public money replacing corporate or union donations, B.C. Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson, B.C. Greens leader Sonia Furstenau and B.C. NDP leader John Horgan take part in election debate at the University of B.C., Oct. 13, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)
B.C. MLAs ponder 2022 ‘sunset’ of subsidy for political parties

NDP, B.C. Fed call for increase, B.C. Liberals have no comment

Investigators use a bucket to help recover human remains at a home burned in the Camp fire, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, in Magalia, Calif. Many of the missing in the deadly Northern California wildfire are elderly residents in Magalia, a forested town of about 11,000 north of the destroyed town of Paradise. (AP Photo/John Locher)
‘Forever War’ with fire has California battling forests instead

Five of the state’s largest-ever blazes seared California last year, as authorities tackle prevention

Tokyo 2020 President Seiko Hashimoto and IOC President Thomas Bach, on a screen, speak during a five=party online meeting at Harumi Island Triton Square Tower Y in Tokyo Monday, June 21, 2021. The Tokyo Olympics will allow some local fans to attend when the games open in just over a month, Tokyo organizing committee officials and the IOC said on Monday. (Rodrigo Reyes Marin/Pool Photo via AP)
Tokyo Olympics to allow Japanese fans only, with strict limits

Organizers set a limit of 50% capacity — up to a maximum of 10,000 fans

Most Read