Following the judging of all the projects

Following the judging of all the projects

Putting scientific theories to the test

Inquiring minds displayed their theories for all kinds of projects at the East Kootenay Regional Science Fair this past weekend.

Trevor Crawley

Inquiring minds displayed their theories for all kinds of projects at the East Kootenay Regional Science Fair this past weekend.

Hosted by the College of the Rockies, the fair featured over 110 projects in the competitive portion and a further 60 in the non-competitive portion that included students from School District 5 and 6.

Four projects were selected to represent the East Kootenay at the Canada Wide Science Fair in Fredericton, which features student projects from across the country with roughly $1 million in scholarships up for grabs.

Sandi Lavery, co-chair of the EKRSF committee, said the science fair is all about stoking the imagination and curiosity of young students.

“The children are always excited to share their work and all their critical thinking skills and their projects,” said Lavery.

Lavery noted that the student body was more diverse this year, with more older Grade 11 and Grade 12 students entering projects into the fair.

“We want to really try to get more [of them] because there are so many scholarships available at the regional level as well as the Canada Wide Fair and if we’re able to send some students with Grade 11 or 12, they have an increased chance of scholarships all over the country,” said Lavery.

When it comes to evaluating the project, Lavery said the judges look for a few elements.

“The number one thing is scientific thought. So they’re looking at scientific thought, it’s not as much about the display on the board than it is being able to answer the questions, to discuss the topic and to discuss the science behind the topic,” Lavery said. “Not just repeating the science of their projects, it’s thinking outside the box on what they could do.”

Some of the winning projects included an innovative idea to use triangulation to block a cell phone for someone sitting in the drivers seat of a vehicle. Another project looked at the effectiveness of sandbags using petroleum jelly in preventing flooding.

Additionally, there were other special projects such as a Grade One class from T.M. Roberts that studied the effect of sunlight on different objects.

In addition to the projects, there were displays out in the COTR lobby from organizations such as the Kootenay Trout Hatchery and the Rocky Mountain Trench Society.

The event also featured a special guest speaker, as Abigail Harrison, or Astronaut Abby, came in from Minnesota to talk to students at the Key City Theatre and the COTR lecture theatre.

Harrison is a 17-year-old who has attended three rocket launches and is following her dream of becoming an astronaut and being the first person on Mars.

The Quantum Award

Winner (most promising young scientist)

Time To Shine

Student: Cameron Brown

School: St Mary’s Catholic

Grade: 6

Best of Fair

Winner (trophy and $200 cash)

Multi Hydrocarbon based approach to Water Retention Technologies

Student: Rory Smith (Grade 8)

School: Kimberley Independent School

Grade: 8

CWSF Student for Science Fair Foundation of BC (East Kootenay)

*The students will represent the East Kootenays at the Canada Wide Science Fair

Multi Hydrocarbon based approach to Water Retention Technologies

Student: Rory Smith

School: Kimberley Independent School

Grade: 8

Love that Dirty Water

Student: Emma Soetaert

School: The Fernie Academy

Grade: 7

Brain Nurture

Student: Sindella Sugden

School: The Fernie Academy

Grade: 12

Pain! M.R.Why?

Student: Eva Sombrowski

School: The Fernie Academy

Grade: 11