Bringing back the spirit of the Sock Hop

Joseph Creek Village had a 50s/60s Sock Hop on Friday, with music, a vintage malt shop and even the front of a '57 Chevy on display.

Mae and Hardy Dittmar share a dance at the Sock Hop at Joseph Creek Village on Friday afternoon. The event was a throwback to the informal dance events popular with teenagers in the 50s and 60s.

Mae and Hardy Dittmar share a dance at the Sock Hop at Joseph Creek Village on Friday afternoon. The event was a throwback to the informal dance events popular with teenagers in the 50s and 60s.

Arne Petryshen

Joseph Creek Village had a 50s/60s Sock Hop on Friday, with music, a vintage malt shop and even the front of a ’57 Chevy on display.

Of the 102 residents at Joseph Creek, all who could make it came out to take part in the event — listening to the band and enjoying some refreshments from the good old days.

Joyce Turner, EK Regional Manager, said they had a request for the event in the suggestion box for residents.

“It was actually the only suggestion we received in the eight months I’ve been here, so we thought it kind of foolish not to act on it,” she said.  “So between ourselves, family council and our recreation staff, we’ve come together and this is what we planned.”

She said the whole thing took a lot of planning and work to put together, and is all worth it to see the smiles and memories brought back for the residents.

The music was care of East West Connection. One of the band’s members has a family member who is a resident at Joseph Creek.

The 50s/60s theme included records dangling from the ceiling, a vintage Coca-Cola displays and of course the front of a ’57 Chevy.

The front of the truck came from one of the resident’s own collections.

The soda shop went along with the food theme of the party as well, with the residents enjoying root beer and cream soda floats.

Kat Zorn, from Joseph Creek’s recreation department, said they started planning the event three months ago, even before the suggestion was received from the resident. She said it was a pleasant coincidence that the suggestion could be accommodated with the original plan.

Zorn said at first they had planned to construct a car, but she thought she could probably get an actual car for the event.

“I talked to Don Carter, because he’s a car buff,” she said. She asked if he had a hood and fenders from a 50s era car or truck. He said he did.

“All of a sudden it arrives out there, then we got the guys in maintenance to set it up so it wasn’t dangerous,” she said.

Another resident and her husband collect the Coke memorabilia which made up the display.

“So then we put all this stuff together,” Zorn said.

Turner said she has been impressed with the way the community gets behind events.

“It’s fantastic how much support from the community, be not family members or volunteers, that we do get is really remarkable,” she said. “It is very much appreciated, just the day-to-day things that our volunteers do to bring up the residents.”