Set the controls for the stars

Interstellar travel is now possible

Gwynne Dyer

Want to be cheered up at the end of this benighted year? Okay, how’s this? It’s starting to look like interstellar travel may be possible in a time frame that would be manageable for human beings.

No, it’s not a cure for cancer. But we know that we are bound to find that eventually, so long as our civilisation is not destroyed by war or global warming or a random asteroid strike. Until very recently, our understanding of science told us that travel even to the nearest stars will never be possible.

That may still be true, for the answers are not all in yet. But last April the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration gave James Woodward and the Space Studies Institute a Phase 2 grant under the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts programme.

They got a Phase 1 grant in 2017 to work on their proposed space drive. They made enough progress to keep NASA happy and themselves credible, and they have now been funded to test new designs that increase the thrust produced by their Mach Effect Gravity Assist (MEGA) drive. If that scales up satisfactorily, we will one day be able to build spaceships that go to the stars.

I must admit that I really enjoyed writing that last line, for all my life I have been told that interstellar travel is only science fiction. Real space flight is ruled by Russian scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky’s classic rocket equation of 1903, which says that a rocket can get into space by expelling enough of its mass (fuel) at high velocity, but also says that the payload and/or the speed is strictly limited.

More payload or more speed is possible, but only by burning more fuel. You must carry that fuel all the way from launch, which makes the vehicle heavier, which requires more fuel, and so on.

The ‘tyranny of the rocket equation’ is what makes space flight so expensive, and interstellar travel by rocket impossible. For a manned spaceship to reach the nearest star (Proxima Centauri, 4.2 light years), slow down again when it gets there, and do it all within one human lifetime, it would have to burn an amount of fuel roughly equal to the total mass of the Sun.

The fuel is the problem, not the distance. If you didn’t have to bring the fuel with you, sending a 400 kg. payload to Proxima Centauri and putting it in orbit around the most Earth-like planet would require a few years’ acceleration at a modest 1g, a maximum speed of 0.4c (four-tenths of light-speed, so no major relativistic effects), and a few years’ deceleration at the far end. It would arrive in around 20 years.

All recent proposals for interstellar flight have therefore abandoned rocketry and assumed ultra-light vehicles that carry large sails and are pushed by Earth-based lasers or by the solar wind. Two problems: the push dies away before they have travelled even one light-year, and they have no way of stopping at their destination.

So along comes Dr James Woodward, who published his first peer-reviewed article on the Mach effect in 1990, and Dr Heidi Fearn, his colleague at California State University, Fullerton. They worked on the theoretical physics of the Mach effect, they built miniature models of a space drive that doesn’t need to burn a propellant and tested them, and gradually the space community began to take them seriously.

NASA is certainly taking them seriously now. Contrary to what some of their critics claim, what they are doing does not violate fundamental physical laws like ‘every action must have an equal and opposite reaction’. However, it does run contrary to our daily experience of those laws by exploiting some of the more arcane aspects of quantum physics.

I’d explain the Mach effect in greater detail, but I barely understand it myself. Suffice it to say that their MEGA drive uses electricity to produce mass fluctuations within a block of metal, which in turn propels the drive forward without burning fuel. What is it pushing against? All the rest of the mass in the universe.

This isn’t a sure thing. There is still controversy over whether the ‘push’ is real, or just an electrical or magnetic effect that creates a false positive. But NASA is willing to spend money on it, and a lot of other scientists are now following up on Woodward’s and Fearn’s work.

It would open the doors to the rest of the universe for us. Exploration, colonisation, unlimited resources, perhaps contact with other intelligences – all of that becomes much more possible than it would be if we must remain forever confined to this one small planetary system. And of course it would make getting around this system a great deal easier: the Moon in four hours, Mars in 2-5 days, Jupiter in 7-8 days.

How’s that for (potentially) good news?

Gwynne Dyer’s new book is ‘Growing Pains: The Future of Democracy (and Work)’.

Photo courtesy iflscience.com

Just Posted

44 Engineer Squadron’s new Cranbrook armoury officially opens

The Canadian Army and the City of Cranbrook celebrated the start of… Continue reading

Three ICE players make NHL midseason rankings

Two ICE forwards and a goaltender make the NHL’s midseason rankings ahead of the 2019 draft.

Cranbrook’s top official inks new contract

Chief Administrative Officer David Kim signed five-year agreement in September

Weekend wrap-up: ICE finish six-game road trip

The Kootenay ICE went 2-3-1 on their road trip as they finished up against the Wheat Kings.

The shootout at the Bechtel Ferry: 1945

On August 24, 1945, Charles Bechtel, age 66, was killed by the BC Provincial Police just south of the ranch.

New Canada Food Guide nixes portion sizes, promotes plant-based proteins

Guide no longer lists milk and dairy products as a distinct food group

Cannabis-carrying border crossers could be hit with fines under coming system

Penalties are slated to be in place some time next year

Man accused of threatening to kill ‘as many girls as I see’

Christopher W. Cleary wrote he was angry because he’d never had a girlfriend and wanted to ‘make it right’ with a mass shooting

Canadian talent abound on newly revamped Vancouver Whitecaps squad

Lineup is full of new faces after the organization parted ways with 18 players over the off-season

B.C. Green leader calls for long-term legislature financial audit

Andrew Weaver says trust in clerk and sergeant at arms is gone

No charges in fatal police Taser incident in Chilliwack

RCMP watchdog concludes no evidence of excessive or disproportionate force was used by officers

Here’s what the B.C. legislature officers are accused of buying with taxpayers’ money

Personal trips, purchases, alcohol and more laid out in 76-page report by Plecas

China demands U.S. drop Huawei extradition request with Canada

Hua said China demands that the U.S. withdraw the arrest warrant against Meng Wanzhou

Alberta youth charged over theft of $17,000 in snow equipment at B.C. ski resort

Alberta RCMP recovered $17,000 in skis/snowboards believed stolen from Fernie Alpine Resort Saturday

Most Read