Vandals spray painted the words Make S.A. Straight Again on Salmon Arm’s rainbow crosswalk on Sunday, July 29. (Photo submitted)

EDITORIAL: Vandalism shows need for rainbow crosswalk

Hateful graffiti shows Salmon Arm’s need for a symbol of inclusion

Salmon Arm’s rainbow crosswalk appears to be bringing out the worst in our community.

What was meant to be a symbol of inclusion, a public display of tolerance and caring for individuals who, in many cases, have struggled with issues of identity and discrimination, has become a lightning rod for opposing views. This has been demonstrated through acts of vandalism and comments on social media ranging from dismissive to outright disgusting.

Related: Police call Salmon Arm rainbow crosswalk vandalism a hate crime

Most abhorrent was the graffiti scrawled over the three week-old rainbow crosswalk Sunday night, words that have police calling the act a hate crime. It’s rather telling that the words used in this hate crime borrow from an insular slogan made popular again by the current U.S. president.

Unfortunately, these public displays of intolerance were predictable.

In most cases where communities across B.C. have proceeded to paint a rainbow crosswalk, there has been controversy and division. And, subsequent to its painting, there has been vandalism.

Related: Salmon Arm’s rainbow crosswalk vandalized after one week

Related: Salmon Arm council approves rainbow crosswalk

Courtenay’s rainbow crosswalk was vandalized one day after it was installed with burnout marks. The day after New Westminster’s rainbow crosswalk was unveiled, a 91-year-old man poured white paint on it. Fort Langley’s was quickly blemished with burnouts. In Nanaimo, a biblical verse was reportedly painted over one of their rainbow crosswalks. Smithers – burnouts again. And so on.

Precedent, however, is no excuse for continuity.

Flying a flag honouring First Nations territory or painting a rainbow crosswalk are more than political gestures. They symbolize an openness to learning and understanding more about the world and the people who share it – things that should benefit us all.

Related: First rainbow crosswalk on First Nation reserve in Canada unveiled

Editorial written by staff at the Salmon Arm Observer


@SalmonArm
newsroom@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Outlaws host West Kootenay in Tournament

The Cranbrook Lacrosse Association had their first indoor lacrosse tournament of the year

Rogues look to build on last season success

The Rocky Mountain Rogues have started practices for their 2019 season

Accident at downtown Cranbrook intersection

Emergency personnel were on the scene of an accident at 2nd Street… Continue reading

Ecosystem restoration burns planned for Premier Lake area

Burns to start within next two weeks depending on weather conditions

RCMP looking for help to identify ‘person of interest’ in recent property crimes

Cranbrook RCMP is looking for help identifying the man in the attached… Continue reading

VIDEO: Alberta man creates world’s biggest caricature

Dean Foster is trying to break the world record for a radio show contest

Hugs & Slugs

Slugs: Huge Slugs to the rude, abusive elderly couple at the Superstore… Continue reading

B.C. RCMP receive application for Police Cat Services

RCMP announced the launch of the Police Cat Services unit as an April fools joke

New MRI unit increases access

Interior Health aims for 5100 exams in Cranbrook this year

Kirkland Signature veggie burgers recalled due to possible metal fragments

Recalled products came in 1.7 kg packages with a best before date of Apr. 23, 2019

Chaos at the ferry terminal for people heading from Vancouver to the Island

Easter crowds create backlog at Tsawwassen ferry terminal

Parents of 13 who tortured children get life after hearing victims

One of their daughters fled their home and pleaded for help to a 911 operator

Flooding, climate change force Quebecers to rethink relationship with water

Compensation for victims of recurring floods limit to 50% of a home’s value, or a maximum of $100,000

Most Read