Bob Cox, the chair of the board at News Media Canada, writes about the need for in-depth, credible, independent reporting done by trusted news sources. (File)

COLUMN: Newspapers matter, now more than ever

National Newspaper Week is Oct. 1-7

It is common these days to find news outlets that run features under headlines like: “A look at what didn’t happen this week.”

Journalism never used to worry about what didn’t happen. Airplanes that landed safely — and didn’t crash — never made the news.

But we live in the age of Fake News, with the reality that false information spreads quickly around the world, causing damage that ranges from disrupting democratic elections to tarnishing the reputations of countless innocent individuals.

It has reminded us that in-depth, credible, independent reporting done by trusted news sources is more important than ever.

READ MORE: Feds can’t do much to fight fake news in Canada

We have a job to do. A small part of that job is fighting Fake News by revealing the truth. No, Justin Timberlake did not say pedophiles control the music industry and no, Canada does not impose a 35% tariff on vacuum cleaners from the United States, as some supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump have claimed.

The biggest part of the job is to be your trusted source, to work every day to bring you real news, which is as vital to democracy as clean air, safe streets, good schools and public health.

It isn’t getting any easier. To misquote Mark Twain, reports of the death of newspapers are greatly exaggerated. But the business of bringing you the news — in print, on your phone, your tablet or your desktop computer — is challenged as it has never been before.

COLUMN: Is celebrity gossip your ‘local news’? Ottawa seems to think so

In the digital age, our audiences are larger than ever. There is a steady desire for news and information. But paying for it — maintaining the strong newsrooms that tell the stories of our communities — is harder and harder.

Advertisers have shifted much of their money to global giants that don’t spend money on reporting, whether it’s what happens on Parliament Hill or at City Hall.

We are seeking new business models that can continue to do the hard work of independent journalism across Canada—and asking for your help to secure a future in which real news remains strong.

During National Newspaper Week 2018, we’re asking you to show your support for the Canadian news media industry.

Let’s send a message — to businesses, to government, to journalists across Canada — that newspapers matter. Now more than ever. Pledge your support at www.newspapersmatter.ca.

Bob Cox is the publisher of the Winnipeg Free Press and chair of the board of News Media Canada

Just Posted

Kootenay Rockies Gran Fondo celebrates volunteers, sponsors

The Cranbrook Rotary Club honoured volunteers and sponsors of the Kootenay Rockies… Continue reading

Aquatic centre to remain closed for the next month

City staff say the closure is due to ongoing roof construction at Western Financial Place

Regional chambers meet with provincial government staff

Regional representatives with Kootenay chambers of commerce recently met with the provincial… Continue reading

Latest round of Columbia River Treaty talks wrap up in Cranbrook

Federal, provincial, U.S. and Indigenous representatives recently met for eight round of discussions

Registration open now for Kootenay Up and Down disc golf tournament

PDGA sanctioned, B-tier tournament takes place Oct. 5-6 at Wycliffe and Cranbrook courses

VIDEO: Liberals make child care pledge, Greens unveil platform on Day 6 of campaign

Green party leader Elizabeth May unveils her party’s platform in Toronto

Canucks sign Brock Boeser to three-year, US$17.6-million deal

Young sniper will be in Vancouver Tuesday

B.C. forest industry looks to a high-technology future

Restructuring similar to Europe 15 years ago, executive says

RCMP conclude investigation into 2017 Elephant Hill wildfire

Files have been turned over to BC Prosecution Service

B.C. wants to be part of global resolution in opioid company bankruptcy claim

Government says settlement must include Canadian claims for devastation created by overdose crisis

B.C. ends ‘birth alerts’ in child welfare cases

‘Social service workers will no longer share information about expectant parents without consent’

U.S. student, killed in Bamfield bus crash, remembered as ‘kind, intelligent, talented’

John Geerdes, 18, was one of two UVic students killed in the crash on Friday night

Driver of RV in Hosmer collision reported in stable condition

Collision occurred in Hosmer on September 5 and involved a semi truck, an RV and a school bus

Free Tesla 3 offered with purchase of Surrey townhome

Century Group’s offer for Viridian development runs through Oct. 31

Most Read