Western Forest Products and United Steelworkers Local 1-1937 have reached a tentative agreement to end a more than seven-month-long strike. Pictured here, workers during a rally in Nanaimo on Nov. 6, 2019. (Black Press File Photo)

Western Forest Products and union reach tentative deal to end 7-month-long strike

USW Local 1-1937 membership still has to vote on the terms

The end may be near for a coastal forestry strike that recently entered its eighth month.

Western Forest Products and the United Steelworkers Local 1-1937 announced today they have agreed to the terms of a tentative collective agreement.

“With the assistance of special mediators, Vince Ready and Amanda Rogers, we have reached a fair and equitable agreement that balances the needs of our employees and our business,” said Don Demens, President and Chief Executive Officer of Western. “This has been a particularly challenging time and I’m pleased that we were able to find common ground through the efforts of all involved.”

The strike has impacted families up and down the Island, but it has been felt especially hard by North Island communities. A grassroots group called Loonies for Loggers began and has been helping support families on the Island who are affected by the strike since the fall.

RELATED: Striking loggers receive support at Campbell River rally

The development comes after months at a standstill.

Among the issues for the union were alternate shifts and a company drug and alcohol policy.

In mid-December, the union had said it was willing to modify its position if talks progressed. But they broke off just before Christmas.

Mediators called the parties back to mediation at the end of January and in early February said they would review their positions.

Early last week, Ready and Rogers withdrew from the mediation process. At the time, they said they saw “no basis for a negotiated settlement.”

They were re-appointed Thursday morning by Harry Bains, Minister of Labour and given “additional powers under the Labour Relations Code.”

RELATED: Campbell River City Council to give $20K to Loonies for Loggers

“This dispute has taken a huge toll on workers and their families as well as the entire coastal forestry community,” he said in a Feb. 6 press release. “We want to see everyone get back on the job.”

USW membership will have a ratification vote on the tentative agreement. The USW bargaining committee has said they will be advising members to accept the agreement.

In a statement today, Brian Butler, president of USW Local-1937, said the details of the agreement would not be released until after the union’s members have a chance to look at and vote on the terms of the agreement. No date has been set, but Butler said he hopes this happens “in a timely manner.”

He is pleased there are no concessions in the tentative agreement.

“Our union is extremely proud of our members’ solidarity in this extended struggle to achieve a fair collective agreement with Western Forest products and their associated contractors,” said Butler. “The local union wishes to thank mediators Vince Ready and Amanda Rogers for their assistance in teaching the tentative agreement.”

The strike began on July 1, 2019.


@marissatiel
marissa.tiel@campbellrivermirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

forestry

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Kootenay-Columbia MP urges end to ‘illegal roadblocks’ in solidarity with pipeline dispute

Rob Morrison says protestors across Canada need to remove roadblocks on roads, rail lines

Regional District of East Kootenay draft 5-year financial plan open for review

The public comment period is open until noon on March 2

Eagles Boxers at BC Championships

Pictured above: Eagles Boxers are back from the BC Provincial Championships in… Continue reading

It happened this week in 1913

February 16 - 22: Compiled by Dave Humphrey from the archived newspapers… Continue reading

Key City Theatre establishes new endowment fund

The Key City Theatre Legacy Fund was made possible thanks to an anonymous donation

VIDEO: Behind the scenes of turning newspapers into digital archives

Kelowna Capital News donated materials dating from 1980 to 2000

Heart attacks strike B.C. husband and wife just over one year apart

Courtenay couple share personal stories to bring awareness to heart month

‘Nothing surprises us anymore:’ U.S. border officials find brain in package

U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents found the brain packed in a glass mason jar in a Canada Post shipment

Adapting to love along the Columbia River

One man starts a GoFundme to help his partner with health costs caused on the trip where they met

B.C., Ottawa sign sweeping 30-year deal for northern caribou habitat

West Moberly, Saulteau co-manage new protection on two million acres

Eyes on police after Trudeau orders blockades torn down, injunctions enforced

The RCMP in B.C. have sent a letter to the traditional leaders of the Wet’suwet’en Nation

B.C. massage therapist suspended following allegations of sexual misconduct

While suspended, Leonard Krekic is not entitled to practice as an RMT in B.C.

Cheapest in B.C.: Penticton gas prices dip below $1 per litre

Two stores in Penticton have gas below a dollar.

Loans or gifts? Judge rules woman must pay B.C. man back $7K

B.C. judge rules that woman must pay back more than $7,000 in advanced funds to man

Most Read