Vancouver Police are asking the public to help them identify a suspect, seen here in a red basketball jersey, who assaulted a homeless man in Vancouver’s Yaletown neighbourhood on July 26. (VPD photo)

Vancouver Police are asking the public to help them identify a suspect, seen here in a red basketball jersey, who assaulted a homeless man in Vancouver’s Yaletown neighbourhood on July 26. (VPD photo)

Unprovoked disturbing assault on homeless man leaves Vancouver police looking for suspect

The suspect is believed to be in his 20s with an above-average build and a medium skin tone

Vancouver Police are asking the public for help identifying a man who was caught on video violently assaulting a homeless man in Vancouver’s Yaletown neighbourhood.

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On Wednesday (Aug. 25), Vancouver police released a video taken by a witness on July 26 around 1 a.m. on Hamilton Street. The video shows a group of men in their 20s arguing when an elderly homeless man walked past the group. The suspect swatted at the victim, chased him down the sidewalk, pushed him to the ground and repeatedly kicked him in the body and head.

RELATED: Vancouver police release dashcam footage in hopes of identifying assault suspect

“This must have been terrifying for the victim, who is already vulnerable and did not deserve to be treated this way,” VPD Sgt. Steve Addison said. “We owe it to him to solve this crime and we’re asking anyone with information to give us a call.”

The suspect is believed to be in his 20s, may wear glasses, with an above-average build and a medium skin tone. He was last seen walking away from the crime scene in the company of other men.

Anyone who can identify the suspect or the people he was with, is asked to call a tip line at 604-717-4022.

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Addison said the VPD is concerned about the rise in stranger assaults in Vancouver, pointing to an increase in people on the streets due to relaxed COVID-19 restrictions.

“Simply bringing more people out on the streets is leading to additional conflicts between people,” he said.

Other factors could include mental health issues, drug and alcohol use, as well as ‘anti-social’ behaviour, Addison said.


@SchislerCole
cole.schisler@bpdigital.ca

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