SCRATCH online gets facelift

SCRATCH magazine has been publishing Columbia Basin youth writings and more for 10 years, and has now relaunched its website to suit 2012.

After 10 years of publication, Columbia Basin Trust is re-launching SCRATCH magazine’s online presence just in time for the second issue of the year to hit the streets.Michelle d’Entremont, SCRATCH editor, said the new interactive website launched on October 16 and budding writers will have new challenges and opportunities handed to them. “That website was kind of out of date and wasn’t really working,” d’Entremont said. “Websites these days are definitely a key contact point.”Now the new website is cleaner and has removed the account features to be in step with modern technology. SCRATCH is now providing more guidelines for youth who would like to submit something, but aren’t really sure what to write about or photograph. “We put together some more structured writing prompts,” d’Entremont said. Now youth will be asked to submit a collection of three photos, which d’Entremont hopes will get them thinking more about their photosgraphy. “We get so many photos, it’s fabulous,” she said. SCRATCH magazine is available in print and online. It has always been in PDF form, but is now in a new fancy 3D edition that can be flipped through, zoomed in on and read like a real magazine. The magazine has come from humble beginnings. It was born out of Columbia Basin Trust’s annual youth conferences when the attendees asked for a forum to have their voices heard and their work published. “they wanted an opportunity where they could share and have a tool to connect with each other,” d’Entremont said. SCRATCH was the result of the discussions had at a youth conference 10 years ago. The first 10 issues were printed in newsprint. There are two editions a year printed, and although d’Entremont holds the title of editor, youth go through the many submissions to select which pieces get printed in the magazine. The youth are paid for their submissions and d’Entremont hands out invaluable feedback and works with each writer to improve their craft. “Those young writers get a really great experience,” she said. “This gives them a chance to have a real working experience outside their education.”The age group is usually age 14 to 29 years old, and d’Entremont said the younger end of the scale are big on submitting poetry. “It definitely provides an opportunity for them to work on something they’re passionate about,” she said. One of the biggest draw for the youth submitting their work is seeing their name in print – and then the paycheque that follows. “We see and hear the excitement when they get published,” d’Entremont said, adding that it’s not all about the youth, either. “People of all ages get a chance to see what youth in the Basin are passionate and caring about.”The latest edition is being printed right now, and will hit the streets next week. It features updates from the projects started at this year’s youth conference that was held in Kimberley in May. “I’m always excited to get a new issue,” d’Entremont said. Information about SCRATCH and the online edition is available online at cbt.org/scratch/. Visit the CBT Youth Facebook page for more.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The third photograph of Robert Johnson

An old photograph comes to light — a reminder that mythology is real and the past is still alive

East Kootenay snow packs still moderately high

EK snow packs at 114 per cent of normal

City launches guide to help simplify development processes

A new guide that provides information and background on development applications and… Continue reading

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

Car stolen from Cranbrook airport

Cranbrook RCMP are investigating a report of a stolen vehicle. The 2020… Continue reading

VIDEO: Procession to honour Snowbirds Capt. Jennifer Casey comes to Halifax

Snowbirds service member died in a crash in Kamloops one week ago

B.C. residents can now reserve a provincial campsite for a stay starting June 1

Campsite reservations will only be available to British Columbians

Cullen commission into money laundering in British Columbia resumes today

Inquiry was called amid growing concern that illegal cash was helping fuel real estate, luxury car and gambling

Bike shops busier than ever, but owners worry about stock supply issues

Uptick in cyclists brings new challenges for shops

RCMP facing ‘systemic sustainability challenges’ due to provincial policing role

Provinces, territories and municipalities pay anywhere from 70 to 90 per cent of the cost of the RCMP’s services

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

One man dead after standoff with Chilliwack RCMP

The Independent Investigations Office of B.C. is investigating the RCMP’s role in the death

B.C. employers worry about safety, cash flow, second wave in COVID-19 restart

A survey found 75 per cent of businesses worry about attracting customers

Ex-BC Greens leader Andrew Weaver says province came close to early election

Disagreement centred on the LNG Canada project in northern B.C.

Most Read