A group picture of the three units after the orienteering exercise. From left to right: 2756 Army Corp, 552 Air Squadron (middle) and 561 Air Squadron.

A group picture of the three units after the orienteering exercise. From left to right: 2756 Army Corp, 552 Air Squadron (middle) and 561 Air Squadron.

Regional cadets compete in orienteering exercise

Three regional cadet corps recently competed against each other in an orienteering competition in Cranbrook, with the 552 Air Squadron (Cranbrook) taking first place, followed by 2756 Army Corps (Invermere) in second and 561 Air Squadron (Nelson) in third.

Teams were comprised of two junior cadets (12-14 years old) and two senior cadets (15-18 years old), and had to complete a course.

While the 552 Air Squadron finished first, there was not a lot of time between all three teams when they finished.

All told, there were 20 cadets from three different units participating, with extras also running the course without being offiically tallied.

Orienteering is an outdoor adventure sport involving cross-country navigation skills to traverse unfamiliar terrain, collecting ‘control’ punches in the fastest time. There is often more than one route to choose from, so cadets had to choose which way was best for them. The path might be easier, but longer and the direct route might be faster, but more challenging.

Orienteering is an optional program within the Sea, Army & Air Cadet training syllabus and is being heavily promoted in the province with the assistance of Major Hildebrandt, Victoria and her team. The goal is for all cadet units to participate in this fun adventure sport.

The sport originates from the Swedish Military during the late 19th century. As a part of its training, the first known competition was held for Swedish Military Officers in 1893.

The Canadian Orienteering Federation was formed in 1967.