The RDEK endorsed a proposed boundary extension from the City of Cranbrook that would include three parcels of land at the south end of the city.

The RDEK endorsed a proposed boundary extension from the City of Cranbrook that would include three parcels of land at the south end of the city.

RDEK endorses proposed City of Cranbrook boundary extension

The Regional District of East Kootenay endorsed a proposed boundary extension south of Cranbrook that would see approximately five hectares brought into the municipal fold.

While supported by both the City of Cranbrook and the RDEK, the boundary extension proposal will now be forwarded to the provincial government, which makes the final decision.

The proposal includes three parcels, which the property owner wishes to subdivide into either 18 parcels or five one-acre parcels, according to an RDEk staff report.

The boundary proposal includes only the road portion of 15th Ave. S into a cul-de-sac and excluding the properties, while running down 17th St. and a portion of 20th Ave. S.

The inclusion of the15th Ave road into the cul-de-sac, but not the adjacent properties, was based on suggestions from officials in Victoria, according to Cranbrook Mayor Lee Pratt.

“So we are willing to look after that road for that U-shaped subdivision that is in the heart of the city that pays taxes to the regional district,” said Pratt, “and it’s been a bone of contention wit the city for a number of years, but anyways, it is what it is and I would really appreciate the support on this.”

If the proposal is approved by the province, the properties will be serviced by city water and sewer, according to Cranbrook Mayor Lee Pratt.

Rob Gay, director for Area C — the rural areas outside the municipal boundaries around Cranbrook — said the boundary extension will not have an impact for his electoral area, save for a minor tweak to fire services funding. However, he added that Area C may not even feel it due to continued and ongoing growth.

“I think to the south of this, the city’s expanded right up against these boundaries, the gentleman that would like to create these 18 lots, it won’t look any different at all, it just changes the city boundary a little bit,” Gay said.

While the RDEK board unanimously endorsed the proposed boundary extension, it was not recommended by staff, as it did not meet the RDEK’s Official Community Plan (OCP) policy of “encouraging comprehensive, block-by-block annexation”, specifically noting that the proposal would have the “undesirable effect of creating an island of rural residences within the City.”