The City of Cranbrook’s mosquito control program is underway, targeting larvae - pictured here. (Photo via Kendra Lewis, Morrow Bioscience Limited)

The City of Cranbrook’s mosquito control program is underway, targeting larvae - pictured here. (Photo via Kendra Lewis, Morrow Bioscience Limited)

Mosquito control program underway in Cranbrook

As larvae begins to develop, the City has applied the first treatment

The City of Cranbrook’s annual mosquito control program is currently underway, with the first treatment having taken place over the past few weeks.

The City’s contractor completed the first treatment, which is directed at mosquitoes in the larval stage, by placing Aquabac larvacide onto sites where larva is found, the City said in a release.

Aquabac is a granular form of mosquito control that the City says contains a naturally occurring bacterium known as Bti (Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis), which targets mosquito larvae and doesn’t harm birds, mammals, beneficial insects or amphibians.

According to the Aquabac website, “Bti is eaten by the pest insect larva, killing them within 4-24 hours after ingestion. Since the bacteria are harmless to beneficial insects, the EPA has categorized the risk to non-target organisms as minimal to non-existent. This means use of Bti does not cause collateral damage to high use areas and leaves no chemical residue to contaminate the environment.”

The product is registered for use in Canada.

The City also asks that residents help to manage and control mosquito populations by taking away any sources of standing water, as it has the potential for mosquito development.

Some places to remove standing water from: clogged gutters and ditches, trays under flower pots, pet dishes that are outside, children’s pools and toys, untreated or unmaintained pools or ponds, bird baths and feeders, tarps, canoes/boats and tires.

“Potential mosquito breeding sites will continually be monitored and treated as needed throughout the spring and summer,” the City said.

There is also a mosquito hotline, 250-421-1294, that residents can call to report potential mosquito development sites or for more information on the control program.