Marijuana can be grown in open fields, soil-based structures or industrial bunkers already built or permitted. (Black Press files)

Marijuana growing rules aim to protect B.C. farmland

Local governments can prevent construction of concrete ‘bunkers’ in ALR

The B.C. government has announced plans to protect farmland from being alienated by concrete-floored “industrial bunkers” built to grow recreational marijuana.

New marijuana structure projects had to have been under construction, with permits, by today (July 13, 2018) to be immune from a new regulation allowing local governments to prohibit them in the Agriculture Land Reserve, the B.C. agriculture ministry says.

RELATED: BC Cannabis stores to start with 150 strains

The federal government has allowed non-medical marijuana in “bunkers,” some of which were built as secure locations for growing licensed medical marijuana. Recreational marijuana growing, possession and use become legal Oct. 17 across Canada, due to federal law passed this spring.

The regulation clarifies that lawful growing of cannabis cannot be prohibited on ALR land if it is in an open field, a structure with a soil base, an existing licensed marijuana operation or a structure already issued local government permits.

Existing structures can only be modified with approval of the local government or First Nation.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Skier triggers avalanche outside boundaries near Kimberley Alpine Resort

The skier was not injured and Kimberley Search and Rescue responded.

Paramedics union raises alarm over spike in out-of-service ambulances

Staffing shortages affecting service levels in Kootenays

City readying for spring melt and potential flooding

Spring has sprung. With the warmer weather on the way, the city… Continue reading

Paul Blais provides daily, free breakfast to Cranbrook’s homeless

After winding up on the streets in 2018, Blais wanted to do everything he could to help others

Police investigating hydro meter theft

RCMP warn about the dangers of severe electrical shock, starting a fire

VIDEO: Can you believe it? This B.C. hill pulls cars backwards up a slope

Sir Isaac Newton had clearly never been to this Vernon anomaly when he discovered gravity

The Kootenay Ice, the Clock, and Time’s Arrow

It was the dying seconds in the last — the very, very… Continue reading

What’s on at the Cranbrook Public Library

Mike Selby Rick James (not the singer) tells the little known story… Continue reading

Letters to the Editor

Respect and Best Wishes Hats off to the fans of the Kootenay… Continue reading

B.C. lottery winner being sued by co-workers

They claim he owes them $200,000 each, in a lawsuit filed in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver

Teacher reprimanded for conduct towards special needs student

Alan Stephen Berry told vice principal he did not have time to use positive strategies

‘Full worm super moon’ to illuminate B.C. skies on first day of spring

Spring has sprung, a moon named in honour of thawing soil marks final super moon until 2020

Having phone within sight while driving does not violate law: B.C. judge

The mere presence of a cell phone within sight of a driver is not enough for a conviction, judge says

Woman punched on the sidelines of B.C. soccer game

Both involved were watching the U21 game in West Vancouver from the sidelines when things got heated

Most Read