Pictured is the teaser photo for “New Roots” a locally-made documentary featuring farmers that live in Wycliffe. The film premiers at the Cranbrook History Centre on June 2nd. (“New Roots” and Cranbrook History Centre file photo)

Pictured is the teaser photo for “New Roots” a locally-made documentary featuring farmers that live in Wycliffe. The film premiers at the Cranbrook History Centre on June 2nd. (“New Roots” and Cranbrook History Centre file photo)

Local documentary ‘New Roots’ to premier at Cranbrook History Centre

The documentary is made by Kimberley’s Mark Locki and features a family farm in Wycliffe

The Cranbrook History Centre will be screening a local documentary this June, as they continue to offer entertainment to the community despite challenges brought on by the pandemic.

‘New Roots’ is a short documentary film that tells the story of two local farmers. It is directed by Mark Locki, with Wildsight and the Cranbrook History Centre. It will premiere online on Wednesday, June 2nd from 7p.m. to 8p.m. There will also be the chance to chat with the film maker and farmers.

As the History Centre points out, the short film follows Michael Albert, Marie-Eve Fradette and their two daughters during a growing season on their farm in Wycliffe.

Tickets are free, however donations are encouraged. Reservations for the screening are required, and can be made online on the Cranbrook History Centre’s website at cranbrookhistorycentre.com.

“Through the film, Michael and Marie-Eve describe their personal journeys, from their youth growing up around farms to their passion for food, and their desire to pass down their knowledge to their children,” reads the film’s description.

“Michael talks about his transformation from being an artist/photographer in his past life to his current art – growing food, and what it means to him personally to be connected to his past. While they know they may not be able to make a significant change in how society currently views food, they know they can provide that change in their own community, and it starts in their household.”

The film also features interviews with Chad Kile and Meredith Funston, who are local food experts and work in the food security and sustainability industry.

Funston heads up the Farm Kitchen and Cranbrook Food Recovery, while Kile works for Wildsight as the Cranbrook/Kimberley food sustainability coordinator.

Filmmaker Locki is based out of Kimberley, BC. He has won awards for his photography, writing and focuses on stories of people, places and culture.



corey.bullock@cranbrooktownsman.com

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