Ktunaxa Laud Minister’s Jumbo Decision

Ktunaxa Nation welcomes a decision that determined a proposed development in the heart of Qat'muk would no longer be able to proceed.

  • Jun. 23, 2015 5:00 a.m.
Reaction pours in after Environment Minister Mary Polak determines that the proposed Jumbo Glacier Resort is not substantially started.

Reaction pours in after Environment Minister Mary Polak determines that the proposed Jumbo Glacier Resort is not substantially started.

Cranbrook/?a·kisk’aq’i’it – The Ktunaxa Nation welcomes a recent B.C. Government decision that determined a proposed development in the heart of Qat’muk would no longer be able to proceed.

“This resort would have caused irreparable damage to Qat’muk and Ktunaxa spiritual values, beliefs and practices,” said Kathryn Teneese, Ktunaxa Nation Council Chair. “These values are in addition to the many environmental and biological impact concerns we had with this project. In our view, it was very clear that the project had not been substantially started. I appreciate the consideration that Minister Polak gave to our submission on the matter.”

Minister of Environment Mary Polak announced on June 18th that the proposed Jumbo Glacier Resort had not met its substantially started threshold by October 12th, 2014. As a result of this decision, the environmental assessment certificate has expired and development of the project cannot proceed.

Qat’muk is where the Grizzly Bear Spirit was born, goes to heal itself, and returns to the spirit world. For Ktunaxa, Grizzly Bear Spirit is a unique and indispensable source of collective as well as individual guidance, strength, and protection. Qat’muk’s spiritual importance is deeply connected to its biological significance for living grizzly bears now and in the future.

“We have opposed this project for almost 30 years,” continued Teneese. “I am hopeful that this battle is now over, but there is still much work to be done. We will continue working on our plan for Qat’muk to ensure that our children, grandchildren and all future generations can experience this area in all its wild magnificence. In the spirit of reconciliation, I hope that we can move on to finding ways in which our values for the area can co-exist with those of other Canadians”