B.C. Hydro studies indicate mobile homes use 50 per cent more electricity than other home type. (File Photo)

B.C. Hydro studies indicate mobile homes use 50 per cent more electricity than other home type. (File Photo)

Heating costs run high for mobile homes, but BC Hydro offers tips

Most mobile home customers in B.C. are low-income, seniors

While mobile homes can save money in some aspects, electricity isn’t one of them, according to a new BC Hydro report.

Many of the 70,000 BC Hydro customers living in mobile homes are using 50 per cent more electricity per square foot than other types of homes, survey results released by BC Hydro on Monday (Jan. 4) shows.

The survey sampled 400 participants, comparing energy use in apartments of similar square footage, as well as townhouses and duplexes with nearly twice the space.

One of the leading causes that inhibit energy efficiency is the age of the mobile house, BC Hydro said. Roughly 70 per cent of mobile home owners surveyed live in a unit that is more than 20 years old. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, mobile homes built before 1980 consume 53 per cent more energy per square foot than all other homes.

RELATED: Cold snap leads to record-breaking electricity demand

Limited insulation options and inefficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning units are the biggest contributors to higher hydro prices, BC Hydro said.

Roughly 20 per cent of mobile home owners said they use space heaters – one of most expensive ways to warm a home. On top of that, 90 per cent of mobile home customers report opening windows as a way to regulate temperature, wasting more energy.

About half of mobile home owners surveyed said they use a portable air conditioner, which use 10 times more energy than a central air system or a heat pump – the most efficient way to regulate temperature in the home.

RELATED: BC Hydro reduces rates by 0.61 per cent

While a majority of mobile home owners said they are interested in conserving energy and saving money, just as many are worried about those costs and don’t know where to begin. Sixty per cent are over the age of 60 and likely on fixed incomes.

B.C. Hydro said improving insulation can cut down on energy costs, especially in the colder months when heat is most commonly used.

More than half of survey participants said they haven’t draft-proofed their windows and doors, but sealing gaps and cracks to prevent air escape is a great way to cut down on temperature regulation costs.

BC Hydro also recommends taking advantage of rebates and incentives; the utility offers up to $2,000 in rebates for upgrading windows, doors and installing heat pumps.


 

@ashwadhwani
adam.louis@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BCHydro

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Latest COVID-19 numbers in Cranbrook and surrounding regions.
Cranbrook sees five COVID-19 cases in first week of January

To date, there have been nearly 230 cases reported in the East Kootenay region

(Courtesy photo)
SD5 joins teachers in calling for end to FSAs

School District 5 has sent a letter to the Ministry of Education to replace FSAs with alternate testing

Cranbrook Search and Rescue safely and effectively rescued an injured snowmobiler on January 16. Pictured are six members took part in a Avalanche Skills Training Level 1 course, which also took place on the 16th. Members are required to have at minimum AST1 for winter responses. (Facebook/Cranbrook SAR file)
Cranbrook SAR rescues injured snowmobiler from Lumberton area

A helicopter crew assisted in safely and quickly located the injured person

City hall. Black Press file photo.
OPINION: Cranbrook needs a homeless shelter

Whether at 209 16th Ave. N or in another location, the city is in desperate need of a year-round shelter

A juvenile sturgeon in a B.C. rearing facility. The wild population in the Upper Columbia is estimated at 1,100 individuals, enhanced with roughly 5,500 hatchery fish. (file photo)
B.C.’s Upper Columbia sturgeon endure long battle with local extinction

Decades of monitoring and intervention is ongoing to save the prehistoric fish

A scene from “Canada and the Gulf War: In their own words,” a video by The Memory Project, a program of Historica Canada, is shown in this undated illustration. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Historica Canada
New video marks Canada’s contributions to first Gulf War on 30th anniversary

Veterans Affairs Canada says around 4,500 Canadian military personnel served during the war

Canada released proposed regulations Jan. 2 for the fisheries minister to maintain Canada’s major fish stocks at sustainable levels and recover those at risk. (File photo)
New laws would cement DFO accountability to depleted fish stocks

Three B.C. salmon stocks first in line for priority attention under proposed regulations

Gin, one of the Kantymirs’ two sheep. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)
Sheep start up ATV, sit in cars and go for walks in Salmon Arm

Until they bought two sheep, Ken and Karleen Kantymir didin’t realize just how social the animals are

Heather Lucier, a pastor at Kelowna Harvest Fellowship, speaks to an RCMP officer outside of Harvest Ministries on Sunday, Jan. 10. (Michael Rodriguez - Capital News)
Kelowna church fined 2nd time for violating public health order

Harvest Ministries in Kelowna has previously said they will fight the tickets in court

Powell River-Sunshine Coast MLA Nicholas Simons was appointed to the NDP cabinet as minister of social development and poverty reduction after the October 2020 B.C. election. (Hansard TV)
B.C. job training fund increased for developmentally disabled

COVID-19 has affected 1,100 ‘precariously employed’ people

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

The Ginkgo Biloba is the only surviving species of the Ginkgoales. Photo: pixabay.com
Cranbrook man hoping to bring 200 million-year-old trees to Creston

The Ginkgo Biloba is the only surviving species of the Ginkgoales, and Dan Hicks has been on a mission since last summer to bring them back to this side of Canada.

B.C. driver’s licence and identity cards incorporate medical services, but the passport option for land crossings is being phased out. (B.C. government)
B.C. abandons border ID cards built into driver’s licence

$35 option costing ICBC millions as demand dwindles

Most Read