The Jumbo Valley. Pat Morrow file.

Environmental groups celebrate Jumbo decision

Wildsight, Jumbo Creek Conservation Society say resort cannot be built unless reassessed

On Tuesday, August 6, 2019, the BC Court of appeal upheld a provincial government decision that determined a proposed year-round ski resort west of Invermere was ‘not substantially started’ nearly four years ago.

Environmental groups, including the Jumbo Creek Conservation Society are celebrating the ruling.

East Kootenay environmental group Wildsight, long a proponent of keeping the Jumbo Valley free of future development, has responded to the court ruling.

In a press release, Wildsight’s John Bergenske said that the decision means Jumbo Glacier Resort no longer has valid environmental certificate and the resort cannot be built until re-assessment.

“Wildsight and the Jumbo Creek Conservation Society have spent decades fighting to keep Jumbo Wild. We are thrilled that the court has come to the logical decision that the project was never substantially started and its environmental assessment certificate has expired,” shares Meredith Hamstead of the Jumbo Creek Conservation Society.

“With the resort dead in the water, Jumbo is going to stay wild. Now, it’s time for Qat’muk to be legally recognized,” said Bergenske, Wildsight’s Conservation Director, “and beyond Qat’muk, wildlife need long-term protection in the broader Central Purcell Mountains, all the way from the Purcell Wilderness Conservancy to Glacier National Park.”

This is an important win for the Jumbo Valley and was only possible due to a persistent, collaborative effort of more than two decades by many organizations and individuals passionate about protecting this special place, Bergenske says.

The Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy also put out the following statement on the ruling:

“The BC Court of Appeal’s ruling on August 6th confirms that the Jumbo Glacier Resort project was not substantially started by October 12, 2014, the deadline specified in its environmental assessment certificate (EAC). Pursuant to the Minister’s earlier decision, the certificates is now expired, and the proponent is no longer authorized to construct or operate the proposed project.

“Should the proponent wish to continue development of the project, they must apply for a new valid EAC, starting at the beginning of the EA process. The Environmental Assessment Office would then work with the proponent to determine what work already completed under the expired EAC is still relevant and could be carried over to a new EA. Prior to issuance of an EAC, proponents may conduct preliminary activities or exploratory works requiring provincial authorizations in order to advance their EAC application; however, any provincial authorizations required for development may not be issued until after an EAC is issued.”



carolyn.grant@kimberleybulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Kootenay-Columbia candidate cautious after getting threats

Trev Miller of the Animal Protection Party carries on campaigning under shadow of threats, abusive emails

Buck Stops Here: Why the name of Cranbrook’s new team is a good one

It’s not just because my nickname in high school was ‘Buck’ that… Continue reading

Feud with Canada Post causes post office to close its doors

Grasmere Post Office will close Oct. 31, building owners unable to reach agreement with Canada Post

Kootenay-Columbia riding candidates have Canada’s highest expense limit

Facebook data also shows who is buying ads on the social media website

Former Liberal candidate endorses Greens in Kootenay-Columbia

Don Johnston says he’ll be voting for Abra Brynne on Oct. 21

ELECTION 2019: Have Justin Trudeau’s Liberals really cut middle-class taxes?

Conservative Andrew Scheer vows to cut bottom bracket, NDP’s Jagmeet Singh targets wealth tax

‘Sky didn’t fall:’ Police, lawyers still adjusting after pot legalization

Statistics Canada says 541 people were charged under the federal Cannabis Act between Oct. 17, 2018 and the end of the year

Fewer people prescribed opioids in B.C., but other provinces lack data: doctors

Patients who began taking opioids were prescribed smaller doses for shorter duration

Electric cello, stolen from vehicle in Williams Lake, returned to U.S. owner

Rita Rice of Texas said she and her husband had given up hope of ever seeing it again

Drop, cover and hold on: Thousands of British Columbians to take part in earthquake drill

This year’s drill comes as scientists announce discovery of ‘stormquakes,’ an earthquake and hurricane

Woman, 24, faces life-altering injuries after being dragged 4 blocks by vehicle in Vancouver

A gofundme account says the woman will have to undergo multiple complex surgeries

Frustration and pride in Canada after a year of legal pot

It’s one year into Canada’s experiment in legal marijuana, and hundreds of legal pot shops have opened

West Kelowna business facing charges after six bears killed over littering

A West Kelowna business has been charged for leaving garbage around Lake Okanagan Resort

Most Read