Pictured is the Cranbrook Fire and Emergency Services truck on Monday, June 28th. They will be set up at various parks around town on June 29th and 30th to help cool people down. (Submitted file)

Pictured is the Cranbrook Fire and Emergency Services truck on Monday, June 28th. They will be set up at various parks around town on June 29th and 30th to help cool people down. (Submitted file)

Cooling stations set up in Cranbrook as heat wave intensifies

Temperatures are expected to each over 40C the next few days

The City of Cranbrook has opened several cooling centres amid the province-wide heatwave that continues to see record-breaking temperatures.

The Cranbrook Public Library is now open as a cooling centre for anyone who needs to get out of the heat, said the City in a press release. The building is open during their regular business hours, with extended hours until 8 p.m. on Tuesday June 29th and Wednesday, June 30th. The library will be closed on Canada Day, July 1.

Fountains are also open and City staff will regularly be sanitizing them. That said, the City encourages people to have their own water with them when visiting parks and other facilities.

Be on the lookout for Cranbrook Fire and Emergency services, as they will be popping up around town at various parks and using their water systems as giant misters. They will be making rounds at public parks over the next two days at 30 minute intervals, whenever available.

Community Connections has also set up a cooling tent in front of their building beside the Memorial Arena.

READ: Cooling tent set up at Community Connections for anyone in need

The City also noted advice from Interior Health on the risks of heat-related illness, and how best to stay cool during this heat wave.

Those most at risk are infants and young children, people 65 years or older (or anyone who needs assistance monitoring their wellbeing), people with heart problems or difficulty breathing, and people who exercise or who work outside.

Symptoms of heat-related illness include pale, cool and moist skin, heavy sweating, muscle cramps, rash, swelling (especially hands and feet), fatigue and weakness, light headedness, feeling faint, headache, nausea and/or vomiting.

There are several steps you can take to avoid heat-related illness. This includes, but is not limited to, planning outdoor activities for before 11 a.m. or after 4p.m., to avoid the intense sun, and drinking plenty of water.

Whenever possible, avoid physical work or exercise outside in the heat of the day. If you must work outside, drink two to four cups of water each hour, even before you feel thirsty. Take rest breaks in the shade.

If you are struggling to keep cool, move indoors to an air-conditioned building or take a cool bath or shower. At temperatures above 30C, fans alone may not be able to prevent related illness.

Never leave children or pets alone in a parked car, and be sure to frequently check on older adults, children, infants, pets and those working outside.



corey.bullock@cranbrooktownsman.com

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