The largest and one of the most complex capiral works projects for 2021 was the lagoon and influent trunk main (pictured), which saw the trunk main being completed from the lagoons to Victoria Avenue. (City of Cranbrook file)

The largest and one of the most complex capiral works projects for 2021 was the lagoon and influent trunk main (pictured), which saw the trunk main being completed from the lagoons to Victoria Avenue. (City of Cranbrook file)

City of Cranbrook made good progress on 2021 capital works projects

Nearly $9.6 million in construction was completed this year

The City of Cranbrook is wrapping up some of their capital works projects, with nearly $9.6 million in construction value completed this year.

Most of the significant projects in this year’s capital works program wrapped up early last week, the City explained in a press release.

Mayor Lee Pratt says that he is happy to see the City’s continued efforts in the improvement of infrastructure and road networks.

“The condition of our roads in Cranbrook continue to move in a positive direction due in part to the dedicated road tax, and the hard work and planning of our staff, our consultants and our contractors. There is still lots of work to do and we are committed to continuing these improvements,” Pratt said.

The largest and one of the most complex projects for 2021 was the lagoon and influent trunk main, which saw the trunk main being completed from the lagoons to Victoria Avenue. This portion of the project cost $4.5 million, and surface restoration of the roadway will be completed by the end of October, said the City. Some of the final concrete and paving work will be postponed until spring of 2022 as winter is on the way.

The purpose of this project is to increase the quality of treated effluent. This process involves replacing all of the piping between and under the lagoon cells. The City must also install a new trunk main that enters the lagoons. There are also plans to improve the overall site to increase the efficiency of treatment and extend its lifespan.

Public Works has employed the use of a microbial blend around the lagoon cells portion of the project, which is intended to induce biological de-sludging at the sewage lagoons site, says the City.

“This economical product has been applied by staff over the summer directly to the lagoons with hopes that the sludge levels will be reduced, which will also improve the lagoon operational effectiveness,” the press release explains. “Sludge levels and their impact on operations are the primary reason for the seasonal odour issues that have occurred recently when warmer runoff and effluent begins to be introduced into the system in the spring.”

There will be further upgrades and improvements to the lagoons themselves, which are in the tail end of the design stages.

“Volatility in supply chains and construction prices have pushed City staff and their consultants to evaluate the best approach to the staging and implementation of the lagoon projects,” the City says, adding that de-sludging of the first lagoon cell is a high priority for next year.

Mike Metejka, Manager of Infrastructure Planning and Delivery for the City, says that most of the contractors and consultants that worked on the projects were local.

“This year’s program saw work awarded to five separate construction contractors, with three based out of Cranbrook,” Matejka said. “We also utilized the services of three engineering consulting firms, two of which are based out of Cranbrook, and the other based in the Elk Valley.”

Another large project this year is the Innes Avenue project, coming in at $1.6 million. Water, sewer and storm sewer infrastructure installation has been finished, as well as road surfacing on Innes and Jostad Avenue, the City says. There were also repairs and upgrades to existing utilities.

“Water, sewer and storm sewer infrastructure installation is complete on 2A Avenue, as is the road and sidewalk construction,” said the City. “Some additional paving and sidewalk replacement was also completed on 3rd Avenue.”

That project is valued at $1.3 million.

The City has also paved a value of $1.6 million in their overall paving program.

In terms of the Mount Royal remediation work, phase one is now complete on Mount Royal Peak and Mount Royal Ridge. The City adds that sewer reconstruction is close to completion on Mount Royal Drive, and road construction will begin immediately after completion. This project is expected to be complete by the end of October at a cost of $1.2 million.

The Wildstone Pressure Reducing Valve (PRV) replacement project is of slightly lesser value than the rest, at $600,000, but not any less important. The City explained that work within Wildstone Drive is complete and re-paving is done.

The new PRV building is expected to be installed in November, with potential commissioning at the end of the year.