Snow measurements from June 1 varied widely around the province, with above average precipitation in the Stikine region and below average in the Boundary and Okanagan. (BC River Forecast Centre map)

Snow measurements from June 1 varied widely around the province, with above average precipitation in the Stikine region and below average in the Boundary and Okanagan. (BC River Forecast Centre map)

British Columbia’s June snow measurements slightly above normal

BC River Forecast Centre has compiled data from around the province

British Columbia’s snow pack levels were near normal according to the June 1 figures, with a provincial average of 107 per cent across all snow measurements.

This is an increase from the May 15 records, which showed an average of 103 per cent of normal.

Data was released from the BC River Forecast Centre. The snow data was gathered from 16 manual snow courses and 86 automated snow weather stations around the province.

READ ALSO: Snow levels above normal in Okanagan

READ ALSO: Okanagan sees highest January snowpack levels in eight years

Measurements around the province varied widely, from a low of 48 per cent of normal in the Boundary region to a high of 275 per cent of normal in the Stikine. The Okanagan recorded 52 per cent of normal, while the Fraser region sites ranged from 81 to 149 per cent of normal.

Northern areas of the province remain above normal as of June 1, including Upper Fraser East, Nechako, Skeena-Nass, Stikine, Central Coast and Peace. Above normal snow pack this late in the season indicates a slightly delayed snow melt compared to average, especially at higher elevations, and does not mean additional snow accumulated in May. Below normal snow for June 1 indicates a relatively early melt, which was especially noticeable this year at lower and mid-elevations.

The overall snow basin index for the entire Fraser River basin is 111 per cent of normal, up from the May 15 figure of 104 per cent of normal.

By June 1, around half of the accumulated snow pack has melted on average. Due to several periods of very warm temperatures during spring, snow melt rate has been slightly higher than normal this year. The overall snow pack at all automated snow weather stations has dropped 60 per cent by June 1 from the peak snow accumulation.

Snow melt measurements from automated snow weather stations during the first week of June indicate extremely rapid melt from very warm temperatures and heavy rain on melting snow. Over the weekend of June 5 and 6, a rapid drop in temperatures resulted in a light dusting of snow at many automated snow weather stations.

Based on the June 1 Snow Basin Indices, above normal snow pack existed for Upper Fraser East, Nechako, Quesnel, Lower Fraser, Upper Columbia, Similkameen, Central Coast, Peace, Skeena-Nass and Stikine; this indicates a continued risk for high freshet flows.

During the first week of June, high streamflow advisories were issued for many of these regions due to snow melt and rainfall. This also included areas that had higher elevation snow remaining such as the North Thompson, East Kootenay, and West Kootenay. Flood warnings were issued in the Stikine and Skeena due to very high flows.

Most of the larger stream systems with significant watershed area at high elevations have peaked and are unlikely to reach these high flows from snow melt alone.

The River Forecast Centre will continue to monitor snow pack conditions and will provide the final seasonal flood risk forecast in the June 15 bulletin, which is scheduled for release on Monday, June 21.

To report a typo, email:
news@summerlandreview.com
.



news@summerlandreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

SnowWeather

Just Posted

Students at Creston Valley Secondary School put together an art installation of a replica residential school room. (Photo by Kelsey Yates)
Creston students create art installation of residential school room

The replica was decorated with a small bed, school uniform, and notes written with pleas for help

A tent housing a mobile vaccination clinic. (Interior Health/Contributed)
Second dose vaccinations accelerating throughout region: Interior Health

To date, more than 675,000 doses have been administered throughout the region

1914
It happened this week in 1914

June 13 - 19: Compiled by Dave Humphrey from the archived newspapers… Continue reading

Prince Charles Secondary School
School District 8 votes in favour of name change for Secondary School in Creston

In an act of reconciliation, a new name will be chosen for Prince Charles Secondary School

Kootenay-Columbia MP Rob Morrison. Photo courtesy Conservative Party of Canada.
MP Morrison appointed to parliamentary national security committee

Kootenay-Columbia parliamentarian one of five candidates appointed to national security committee

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

FILE – A science class at L.A. Matheson Secondary in Surrey, B.C. on March 12, 2021. (Lauren Collins/Surrey Now Leader)
Teachers’ union wants more COVID transmission data as B.C. prepares for back-to-school

BCTF says that details will be important as province works on plan for September

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry outlines B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan, May 25, 2021, including larger gatherings and a possible easing of mandatory masks on July 1. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. records 120 new COVID-19 cases, second vaccines accelerating

Lower Pfizer deliveries for early July, Moderna shipments up

A Heffley Creek peacock caught not one - but two - lifts on a logging truck this month. (Photo submitted)
Heffley Creek-area peacock hops logging trucks in search of love

Peacock hitched two lifts in the past month

The Calgary skyline is seen on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
2 deaths from COVID-19 Delta variant in Alberta, 1 patient was fully immunized

Kerry Williamson with Alberta Health Services says the patients likely acquired the virus in the hospital

The first suspension bridge is the tallest in Canada, with a second suspension bridge just below it. The two are connected by a trail that’s just over 1 km. (Claire Palmer photo)
PHOTOS: The highest suspension bridges in Canada just opened in B.C.

The Skybridge in Golden allows visitors to take in views standing at 130 and 80 metres

BC Green Party leader and Cowichan Valley MLA Sonia Furstenau introduced a petition to the provincial legislature on Thursday calling for the end of old-growth logging in the province. (File photo)
BC Green leader Furstenau introduces old-growth logging petition

Party calls for the end of old-growth logging as protests in Fairy Creek continue

B.C. Premier John Horgan leaves his office for a news conference in the legislature rose garden, June 3, 2020. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. premier roasted for office budget, taxing COVID-19 benefits

Youth addiction law that triggered election hasn’t appeared

A vial containing the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is shown at a vaccination site in Marcq en Baroeul, outside Lille, northern France, Saturday, March 20, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Michel Spingler
mRNA vaccines ‘preferred’ for all Canadians, including as 2nd dose after AstraZeneca: NACI

New recommendations prioritizes Pfizer, Moderna in almost all cases

Most Read