Alberta man dies after plunge from B.C. waterfalls, marking second death in three months

RCMP say the 53-year-old Sherwood Park resident was hiking off marked trail

A 53-year-old Alberta man is dead after falling from the edge of the gorge near the Sicamous Creek Falls.

Sgt. Murray McNeil of the Sicamous RCMP said the man, a Sherwood Park resident, was hiking with a family member shortly before noon on July 29 when he fell into the gorge below. McNeil said the RCMP’s investigation indicates the man left the marked trail to get closer to the edge.

Read More: Man falls to death hiking trail near Sicamous

Read More: Update: Police allege vehicle in Highway 1 collision contained stolen goods

Shuswap Search and Rescue assisted with the recovery of the man’s body.

“Due to the rough terrain and the narrow trails, the body had to be removed with the long lines and the expertise of the Search and Rescue people,” McNeil said.

The Sicamous Fire Department and the Eagle Valley Rescue Society unit assisted with the rescue. The Coroner’s service was also on the scene.

The death of the Alberta man marks the second time in three months that someone has suffered a fatal fall from the area above the waterfall. On May 15 a 27-year-old man fell from the cliff above the falls.

“This is the second occurrence in a year so we’d like to remind everyone to remain on the marked trail and, of course, there is significant danger when approaching the cliff side when off trail at that location,” McNeil said.

Read More: Mr Mikes restaurant opens doors in Salmon Arm

Read More: Okanagan watersheds protection plans aim to reduce wildfire risks

John Schut, a search manager for the Shuswap Search and Rescue, said the July 29 incident occurred very close to where the man fell in May. Schut said the area where the man fell from has sandy soil which can easily cause a loss of footing, and only widely-spaced trees to stop someone from tumbling over the cliff edge.

Schut said in both incidents, the victims were rcovered by Search and Rescue volunteers using long lines anchored at the top of the canyon. He said there is a trail at the bottom of the canyon but it is too narrow for a safe recovery.


@SalmonArm
jim.elliot@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Dynamiters prepare for main camp

The Kimberley Dynamiters will host their main camp on Aug. 30 - Sept. 1 at the Civic Centre

UPDATED: MV Balfour ferry returns to service

The 65-year-old ferry had been out of action for a month

Kiara Ker earns bronze at U17 National Basketball Championships

This was the third time the local basketball player represented Team BC at the national level

Vehicle stolen from downtown Fernie found torched at transfer station

RCMP are seeking witnesses to the theft of a yellow 2002 Subaru… Continue reading

Rossland council urges minister to kill Jumbo Glacier Resort project

Mayor writes letter panning ski resort on environmental, legal, and economic grounds

VIDEO: Could we BE any more excited? ‘Friends’ fans go crazy for merch

Movie theatres will show select episodes to mark the NBC series’ 25th anniversary

Bodies of two missing Surrey men found near Ashcroft

Ryan Provencher and Richard Scurr have been missing since July 17

Pregnant teachers fight to change WorkSafeBC compensation rules

Agency does not recognize risk to unborn babies when mother catches illness from work

Five hedgehogs quickly adopted after being left at BC SPCA

Lucky new owners picked up their pets from Maple Ridge branch on Aug. 20

B.C. cricket players get interrupted by racist remark

Community has had protocols in place for years to respond to prejudice

Groovy B.C. wedding a throwback to Woodstock ‘69

Couple hosts themed wedding 50 years after legendary festival

Nearly 50% of Canadians experience ‘post-vacation blues’: poll

48 per cent of travellers are already stressed about ‘normal life’ while still on their trip

More women may need breast cancer gene test, U.S. guidelines say

Recommendations aimed at women who’ve been treated for BRCA-related cancers and are now cancer-free

Most Read