Wolfgang and Gabriele Brunnbauer of JSL Forum.

JSL takes security to the next level

The team at JSL Forum in Cranbrookhave been connecting and protecting the Kootenays for more than 23 years.

Let’s face it – there are few things more vital to our wellbeing than good security and peace of mind.

In recent years, extraordinary strides have been made in camera and telecommunications, allowing both business and homeowners to have an advantage when it comes to the security of their assets – including the safety of loved ones.

Navigating the latest technology for one’s home or office can be daunting, but not if you have a qualified and trained technician to guide you.

The team at JSL Forum, located in Cranbrook at 412 St. N, have been connecting and protecting the Kootenays for more than 23 years.

“We’re continually training on the latest technology and product offerings to be able to bring you the very best in service and support,” said JSL’s owner Wolfgang Brunnbauer, who opened the family run business with his wife, Gabriele, back in 1994 after relocating from to Cranbrook from Germany.

With over 30 years of worldwide experience, the licensed dealer of Honeywell products in the West and East Kootenays is continually expanding to offer complete security and telecommunication solutions for customers of all sizes.

In addition to guarding against home break-ins, the latest breakthrough technology can alert you of a leaking pipe or burner that has been left on – even a broken light bulb or the temperature of your abode can all be controlled remotely.

“It’s just incredible in the last two or three years what kind of changes we’ve seen in the Wi-Fi world,” said Wolfgang, who specializes in telephone systems, security systems, access control, video surveillance, and data network design/implementation, including fiber optics.

“There’s almost no equipment out there anymore, from smoke detectors to a stove, that we can’t control remotely.”

Last year, JSL proved this after developing a state-of-the-art access control and HD video system for a large commercial client in Elkford.

The system needed to integrate all security measures over several buildings, including three warehouses, explained Brunnbauer.

“I think they were really surprised there was someone here in the Kootenays could pull it all together for them.”

For residential customers, JSL offers the same standard of integration, but on a smaller scale.

“We don’t even talk about alarms, per se, anymore. As soon as somebody rings your doorbell or pushes on the doorknob, we link that through the control panel right to your smart phone. If it’s the postman, you can see him and speak to him and tell him to drop off the package another time, or if one of the kids has forgotten their key you can open the door for them…It allows you to access your lights, turn the heat on in your home so it’s at a comfortable temperature and cozy before you even show up.”

As an electronics engineer and former employee of Germany’s technology giant, Siemens, Brunnbauer is passionate about technological advances in the industry – especially when avoidable danger and destruction hits a little too close to home for comfort.

Like many of Brunnbauer’s clients over the years, the entrepreneur never thought he’d have to worry about the catostrophic damage caused by a flood or fire, but learned the hard way disaster can strike anyone, anywhere.

“I had a big flood in my basement when I was out of town,” said Brunnbauer’s, who, like most Kootenay residents, depends on a well pump for water.

“Even though we have a drain, there was about a foot of water in my utility room, and it’s a large room… it was just a matter of time before it went into the living room. I can promise you I installed a water sensor that weekend. Even though I’ve warned customers for years about the importance of one, I never thought it could happen to me until it did!”

In addition to water sensors, Brunnbauer emphasizes the importance of fire safety, beyond the typical fire alarm system.

“My son-in-law was making chicken soup one day, but forgot to turn the switch off the stove before going out. They had been gone just two hours when they came home to thick swirling smoke.”

Everything from the carpeting and home decor to clothing and furniture was ruined by the smoke.”

Brunbauer often shares the story of the ‘overcooked soup’ to warn other homeowners.

“Here is my message, if you don’t want to spend the money for a whole security system go out and get a wireless one for $150. It can take 10 to 15 minutes for a smoke alarm to go off – in that time the smoke can ruin your home and cause significant damage.”

For more information on how you can stay in touch with your home or business, from anywhere, at any time, visit www.jslforum.com. Follow JSL on Facebook at @JSLForum.

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