Robin Goldsbury (Liberal), Wayne Stetski (NDP) and Abra Brynne (Green) talked about food security issues locally, regionally and nationally during a forum at Auntie Barb’s Bakery in Cranbrook on Saturday.

Robin Goldsbury (Liberal), Wayne Stetski (NDP) and Abra Brynne (Green) talked about food security issues locally, regionally and nationally during a forum at Auntie Barb’s Bakery in Cranbrook on Saturday.

Candidates talk food security at Cranbrook forum

NDP, Liberal and Green candidates answer questions on food security and sustainability

Three candidates running for Kootenay-Columbia discussed food security and climate change during a forum on Saturday night at Auntie Barb’s Bakery in Cranbrook.

Robin Goldsbury (Liberal), Wayne Stetski (NDP) and Abra Brynne (Green) had opportunities to discuss local food security and sustainability issues and climate change, as well as how food policy affects other issues such as poverty, health and education.

Rob Morrison (Conservative) and Rick Stewart (People’s Party) had both agreed to participate however, both cited scheduling conflicts through correspondence and were unable to attend.

It was familiar territory for Brynne, who has worked and volunteered with food security initiatives and programs around Nelson for nearly 30 years.

While Brynne was well-versed in the details surrounding the local challenges, Stetski pointed to his experience building partnerships with First Nations and the agricultural industry during his government career with B.C. Ministry of Environment and as Mayor of Cranbrook, while also touting the work around his National Local Food Day bill.

Goldsbruy also brought a unique perspective as well, with her background as a former marketing professional for Burger King, her experience running a restaurant in Balfour and the challenges of sourcing locally produced ingredients.

Questions from the night included prepared queries asking candidates individual and party positions on fostering cooperation with First Nations, local agricultural producers and various levels of government on food policy.

Other questions quizzed candidate immediate food-related priorities if elected, three personal habits each are doing to reduce their carbon footprint and the role that food policy plays in foreign affairs and trade.

The event was organized by the Cranbrook Food Action Committee and Wildsight Kimberley Cranbrook as part of a national ‘Eat Think Vote’ campaign, that aims to raise the profile of food issues during the election.



trevor.crawley@cranbrooktownsman.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter