These juvenile Great Horned Owls are growing quickly and getting ready to leave their nest. They are one of the most common owls in North America and can be found in many different habitats, from the Arctic to the tropics, including within cities. Great Horned Owls can take down prey larger than themselves but also eat smaller animals such as frogs and rodents. Helga Knote photos

These juvenile Great Horned Owls are growing quickly and getting ready to leave their nest. They are one of the most common owls in North America and can be found in many different habitats, from the Arctic to the tropics, including within cities. Great Horned Owls can take down prey larger than themselves but also eat smaller animals such as frogs and rodents. Helga Knote photos

Urban wildlife Part XII: The East Kootenay birds (and others) of 2021

All throughout 2021, our local photographers have been capturing the best of our feathered friends and furred friends and neighbours. Check out their work that has appeared in the Pages of the East Kootenay Advertiser over the past months. This is Part XII.

Above and below: A Copper’s Hawk flew into the side of a deck, and stunned itself. Local raptor expert Bill Dove came over and checked the hawk out — all was okay. The hawk was released to the wilds shortly after. Gary Billmark photos

Mother Goose and goslings at Idlewild. Craig Montgomery photo

One fiercely proud Mama. Miriam Saville photo

A Common Yellowthroat. Bob Whetham photo

Harlequin Ducks are a spectacularly coloured duck, slate blue with chestnut sides, white stripes on the body and white markings on the head. Inland they can be found in turbulent rivers, diving for invertebrate crustaceans and small fish. During the breeding season they frequent areas of white water, especially if there are rocks, sandbars or small islands for them to rest on. Pairs are monogamous and stay together over the winter months and from one year to the next. Helga Knote photo

A young female Sharp Shinned Hawk looking for a tasty treat. Miriam Saville photo

Above and below: A pied-billed grebe and horned grebe take a break from feeding at Elizabeth Lake.Stewart Wilson photos

A shy Sora made an ever-so-brief appearance at Elizabeth Lake. Bob Whetham photos

See more: Urban Wildlife Part XI

See more: Urban Wildlife Part X

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A Spotted Towhee. Bob Whetham photo

The knight of Cranbrook’s urban forest. Stewart Wilson photo

An immature bald eagle circles over Elizabeth Lake wheeling as it passes Parkland Middle School causing panic among waterfowl as flies lower looking for prey. Stewart Wilson photo

A very regal looking Osprey was scanning for fish from the top of a tall snag at Jimsmith Lake. Helga Knote photo

The Savannah Sparrow looks like many other “little brown birds”, but can be distinguished by a yellow patch between the eye and bill. These sparrows are seed eaters and can be found near the ground in areas with low vegetation. They are widespread throughout North American in grasslands, tundra, marshes and farmland. Helga Knote photo

The American Avocets spent a few days at Elizabeth Lake but seem to have moved on. Bob Whetham photo

The Wilson’s Phalarope took a brief pause from feeding to have a bath. Bob Whetham photo

The Yellow Warbler was a recent arrival at Idlewild. Bob Whetham photo

A touching moment with a young garter snake. Stewart Wilson photo

An American kestrel on a perch overlooking the edge of Elizabeth Lake. Stewart Wilson photo

A female loon on a nest at a local lake from a respectful distance (thanks to a zoom lens). Stewart Wilson photo

Brewer’s Blackbird enjoying the sun. Miriam Saville photo

One of three western meadowlarks which appear to have made a field on the edge of town their home. Stewart Wilson photo

A Cassin’s Finch. Kathleen Opal photo

One of the two snow geese has decided to spend more time at Elizabeth Lake and was spotted feeding in the company of Canada geese. Stewart Wilson photo

Above and below: A male and female cinnamon teal. Stewart Wilson photo

This western painted turtle has found a sun trap with a southern exposure among the cattails at Elizabeth Lake. Stewart Wilson photo

See more: Urban Wildlife Part VII

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See more: Urban Wildlife Part III

See more: Urban Wildlife Part II

See more: Urban Wildlife Part I