Since the Christmas Bird Counts began over a century ago, they has relied on the dedication and commitment of volunteers. If you are a beginning birder, you will be able to join a group that includes at least one experienced birdwatcher. It is a great opportunity to socialize with other bird enthusiasts. Stewart Wilson photo

Since the Christmas Bird Counts began over a century ago, they has relied on the dedication and commitment of volunteers. If you are a beginning birder, you will be able to join a group that includes at least one experienced birdwatcher. It is a great opportunity to socialize with other bird enthusiasts. Stewart Wilson photo

Join the Christmas Bird Count

Around Cranbrook and Kimberley, birders expect to see 40-50 species, up to 2,000 birds

Daryl Calder

You can contribute to 120 years of community science by signing up for a count nearby.

It’s like a little treasure hunt, and if the birds are rare and unusual, it can be quite exciting.

Since the “CBC” began over a century ago, it has relied on the dedication and commitment of volunteers like you.

If you are a beginning birder, you will be able to join a group that includes at least one experienced birdwatcher. It is a great opportunity to socialize with other bird enthusiasts.

Each team of four needs a driver, recorder, spotters and someone who can leaf through a bird guidebook to check the accuracy of each particular sighting.

We tend to drive short distances, hop out to look and listen, and take short walks. Sometimes large flocks of birds are seen; several ‘counter/estimators’ are helpful to provide accurate information. A photographer is very helpful too.

The CBC is an early winter bird census where thousands of volunteers go out to count birds. Counts occur in over 2,000 localities throughout the Western Hemisphere. Counts are organized at the local level, often by a naturalist organization, and co-ordinated in Canada by Bird Studies Canada.

Count volunteers stay within a designated 24 km diameter circle, counting every bird they see or hear on count day. The data collected by CBC participants over the past 120 years, have become 1 of only 2 large pools of information indicating how the birds of the Americas are faring over time.

Around Cranbrook and Kimberley, we can expect to observe approximately 40 to 50 species, and perhaps 1,500 to 2,000 birds. We hope for a cool, calm, bright day, some open water, and clean, well-stocked feeders. A regular group of naturalists heads out every Wednesday morning; you are welcome to join us as we endeavour to become familiar with local birds and their preferred habitats.

If your home is within the boundaries of a CBC circle, you can stay at home and report the birds that visit your feeder on count day. Prior arrangements with the count compiler must be made in advance.

To participate in the count, or to become a ‘feeder watcher’, please go to the Rocky Mountain Naturalist Christmas Bird Count page of our website rockymountainnaturalists.org . Here you will find contact information, important details and reports from recent years. The ‘field work’ is often followed by a pot luck and ‘count up’.

Dates to note:

Creston: December 27, Friday

Cranbrook: December 28, Saturday

Kimberley: January 4, Saturday

Submitted by Daryl Calder, on behalf of Rocky Mountain Naturalists

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A laboratory technician holds a dose of a COVID-19 novel coronavirus vaccine candidate that’s ready for trial on monkeys at the National Primate Research Center of Thailand. (Mladen Antonov - AFP)
Interior Health reports 66 new COVID-19 infections

570 cases are active; 18 in hospital

Chris testing out the potential new van with his caregiver Kerry. Photo submitted.
Kimberley man starts GoFundMe for urgently needed wheelchair accessible van

Christopher Green, a Kimberley native currently residing in Tata Creek, has launched… Continue reading

(stock photo)
Josh Dueck named Team Canada chef de mission for 2022 Beijing Paralympics

An acclaimed Paralympic champion with local roots has been named to a… Continue reading

A woman wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 uses walking sticks while walking up a hill, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Interior Health reports 83 more COVID-19 infections overnight

46 cases are now associated with a COVID-19 community cluster in Revelstoke

What's happening at the Cranbrook Public Library
What’s on at the Cranbrook Public Library

Mike Selby The Library is now open with extended hours (with some… Continue reading

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s coronavirus situation at the legislature, Nov. 30, 2020. (B.C. government)
Hockey team brought COVID-19 back from Alberta, B.C. doctor says

Dr. Bonnie Henry pleads for out-of-province travel to stop

B.C. Premier John Horgan on a conference call with religious leaders from his B.C. legislature office, Nov. 18, 2020, informing them in-person church services are off until further notice. (B.C. government)
B.C. tourism relief coming soon, Premier John Horgan says

Industry leaders to report on their urgent needs next week

An RCMP cruiser looks on as a military search and rescue helicopter winds down near Bridesville, B.C. Tuesday, Dec. 1. Photo courtesy of RCMP Cpl. Jesse O’Donaghey
B.C. Mountie, suspect airlifted by Canadian Armed Forces from ravine after foot chase

Military aircraft were dispatched from Comox, B.C., say RCMP

An 18-year old male southern resident killer whale, J34, is stranded near Sechelt in 2016. A postmortem examination suggests he died from trauma consistent with a vessel strike. (Photo supplied by Paul Cottrell, Fisheries and Oceans Canada)
“We can do better” — humans the leading cause of orca deaths: study

B.C. research reveals multitude of human and environmental threats affecting killer whales

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

A logo for Netflix on a remote control is seen in Portland, Ore.,Aug. 13, 2020. Experts in taxation and media say a plan announced Monday by the government will ultimately add to the cost of digital services and goods sold by foreign companies. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Jenny Kane
‘Netflix tax’ for digital media likely to raise prices for consumers, experts say

The government says Canadian companies already collect those taxes when they make digital sales

Most Read