Sears Canada Chief Financial Officer Billy Wong walks away from the Ontario Superior Court in Toronto on July 13, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Sears Canada Chief Financial Officer Billy Wong walks away from the Ontario Superior Court in Toronto on July 13, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Small cities brace for pending Sears closures

“It will have a direct economic impact on our community,” said Lyn Hall of Prince George.

At Heritage Place Mall in Owen Sound, Ont., an empty Sears department store would leave a mammoth void. The insolvent retailer is one of the mall’s largest occupants. More than 60 people work in the anchor tenant’s roughly 6,500 square metres, a space big enough to fit 14 basketball courts.

If the court approves Sears Canada’s bid to liquidate its roughly 130 remaining stores, the decision will send shoppers, employees and mall owners in Owen Sound and dozens of other smaller Canadian cities scrambling to find alternative shopping destinations, jobs and tenants.

“My first reaction was: Oh, crap,” said Owen Sound Mayor Ian Boddy of hearing the nearly 30-year-old location, is likely to close soon.

“We’re pretty disappointed.”

A closure will hurt the local economy, he said, leaving dozens unemployed and perhaps prompting fewer people to travel to the region to shop.

Some 4,000 kilometres away on the West Coast, the mayor of Prince George, B.C., echoed those concerns about the Sears store at its Pine Centre Mall.

“It will have a direct economic impact on our community,” said Lyn Hall.

Related: Facebook readers weigh in on Sears

The store employs more than 60 people, he said, and sells goods and services to hundreds of thousands living in Prince George and the surrounding areas.

Both leaders wondered how their local malls would cope with an anchor tenant’s departure.

The bulk of the former juggernaut’s stores are in shopping centres in communities like Owen Sound and Prince George — smaller Canadian cities, where the store may serve a larger geographic area than just those living within the city’s borders.

Of Sears’s remaining 74 department stores, all but one are in shopping malls, most in areas with populations under 400,000 and some well under that.

The malls in these so-called secondary or tertiary markets are likely to struggle to fill the vacant space in the event Sears doesn’t sell its leases or real estate to a third party, said Peter D. Morris, the founder of Greenstead Consulting Group, a real-estate consultancy firm.

“I fear some of those smaller properties may not be able to come back at all,” he said, declining to speculate which of the malls may go under.

Related: Sears Canada asks court for permission to liquidate

There isn’t another big department store chain that requires that much space waiting on the sidelines, he said.

The remaining department store mall locations total more than 10.6 million square feet (nearly one million square metres). That means the select few chains like The Hudson’s Bay Company or Simons that could take over some locations have a plethora of real estate to choose from, said Morris, and likely won’t gobble up anywhere close to all the vacant space.

For malls that don’t draw another single anchor tenant, he said, the easiest solution would be to divvy up the former department store space and woo intermediate-size shops, like athletic retailer Sport Chek or bookstore Indigo.

Another possibility, he said, is that certain restrictions in place due to Sears’s lease, like limiting further development, could disappear along with their corresponding leases and open landlords to a whole range of development possibilities. They could choose to build residential units or a mixed-use space that combines entertainment, recreation and shopping, said Morris.

However, that takes time. Consumers could find other venues with a greater selection to shop at in the interim, he said, and landlords will have to find a way to lure them back after the changes are made.

To make matters worse, for many of the malls, the Sears saga is a recurring problem. In recent history, they’ve grappled with the demise of Zellers and, more recently, Target.

Prince George’s Pine Centre Mall, for example, lost its Target location about two years after it opened when the American chain announced it would shutter all of its Canadian stores. A Lowe’s Canada has since opened in the location.

The Sears vacancy — at 10,400 square metres, or 24 basketball courts — will leave a much larger hole for management to fill.

Mayor Hall said he’s not sure what the mall will do, but it will be quite a challenge.

Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.

Aleksandra Sagan, The Canadian Press

Just Posted

The City of Cranbrook and the Ktunaxa Nation raised the flag of the Ktunaxa Nation at the arches entrance into the city’s downtown core during a ceremony on Monday, June 21. Photo courtesy City of Cranbrook.
Ktunaxa Nation flag raised at downtown arches entrance

The Ktunaxa Nation flag was raised at the Cranbrook arches — the… Continue reading

Kimberley Search and Rescue were able to quickly respond to a call for service and transport an injured mountain biker to East Kootenay Regional Hospital over the weekend. Kimberley SAR file photo.
Kimberley Search and Rescue respond to injured mountain biker on Bootleg Mountain

Kimberley Search and Rescue responded to a call for service this past… Continue reading

FILE – Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, takes part in an event on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, July 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Indigenous Peoples Day must be a ‘call to action’, says Assembly of First Nations chief

Discovery of children at Kamloops residential school site must lead to change, Perry Bellegarde says

City of Cranbrook, Ktunaxa Nation to host flag ceremony on National Indigenous Peoples Day. (Corey Bullock file)
City of Cranbrook, Ktunaxa Nation hosting flag ceremony on National Indigenous Peoples Day

A temporary road closure and speed limit reduction will be in effect during the ceremony

A tent housing a mobile vaccination clinic. (Interior Health/Contributed)
Over 5K jabbed at Interior Health mobile COVID-19 vaccine clinics

The clinics have made stops in more than 40 communities since launching last week

The border crossing into the United States is seen during the COVID-19 pandemic in Lacolle, Que. on February 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
VIDEO: Border quarantine to soon lift for fully vaccinated Canadians

Eligible travellers must still take multiple COVID-19 tests

Chilliwack secondary school’s principal is apologizing after a quote equating graduation with the end of slavery in the U.S. was included in the 2020-2021 yearbook. (Screenshot from submitted SnapChat)
B.C. student’s yearbook quote equates grad to end of slavery; principal cites editing error

Black former student ‘disgusted’ as CSS principal apologizes for what is called an editing error

Skeena MLA Ellis Ross. (Photo by Peter Versteege)
BC Liberal leadership candidate condemns ‘senseless violence’ of Okanagan church fires

Skeena MLA Ellis Ross says reconciliation isn’t about revenge for past tragedies

A coroner’s inquest will be taking place at the Capitol Theatre in Port Alberni for the next week. (ELENA RARDON / ALBERNI VALLEY NEWS)
Teen B.C. mom who died following police custody recalled as ‘friend to many’

Police sent Jocelyn George to hospital after intoxication had gone ‘beyond the realm’ of normal detox

FILE - In this Nov. 29, 2020, file photo, Las Vegas Raiders defensive end Carl Nassib leaves the field after an NFL football game against the Atlanta Falcons in Atlanta. Nassib on Monday, June 21, 2021, became the first active NFL player to come out as gay. Nassib announced the news on Instagram, saying he was not doing it for the attention but because “I just think that representation and visibility are so important.” (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)
Nassib becomes first active NFL player to come out as gay

More than a dozen NFL players have come out as gay after their careers were over

Penticton Indian Band Chief Greg Gabriel speaks to the Sacred Hearts Catholic Church burning down early Monday morning, June 21, 2021. (Monique Tamminga Western News)
Penticton band chief condemns suspicious burning of 2 Catholic churches

Both Catholic church fires are deemed suspicious, says RCMP

COVID-19 daily cases reported to B.C. public health, seven-day moving average to June 17, 2021. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C.’s COVID-19 infections drop to 90 on Sunday, 45 Monday

Pandemic spread dwindles as 77% of adults receive vaccine

By protesting uninvited in First Nations’ territories, conservationists are acting in a neocolonial or paternalistic manner, says Huu-ay-aht Chief Robert Dennis. Photo by Heather Thomson
A closer look: do Vancouver Island First Nations support the war in the woods?

First Nations/environmentalist old growth alliance uneasy, if it exists at all

A blood drive in support of 1-year-old Rielynn Gormley of Agassiz is scheduled for Monday, June 28 at Tzeachten First Nation Community Hall in Chilliwack. Rielynn lives with type 3 von Willebrand disease, which makes it difficult for her to stop bleeding. (Screenshot/Canadian Blood Services)
Upcoming blood drive in honour of Fraser Valley toddler with rare blood condition

The Gormley family has organized a blood drive in Chilliwack on June 28

Most Read