New fire truck hits the streets

Cranbrook has a shiny new pumper truck tailor made to fight rural fires

The Cranbrook Fire Department's new Dash CF PUC - a little front line fire engine red.

There’s a new racy red vehicle in town, and it’s not a Mustang.

Cranbrook Fire Department took delivery of a new fire engine on Wednesday, November 28.

The Pierce Dash CF PUC is the first of its kind to be used in North America for front-line use, according to the city.

The engine combines the most rugged and reliable technologies available in a configuration designed for performance and safety. Fire fighters quickly notice the improved visibility, ease of access to the cab and equipment, and the vastly improved handling. The engine has the tightest turning radius available on the market and a unique pump and roll feature which will aid fire fighters in getting water to the fire faster.

“Everything about this state-of-the art truck adds up to enhanced safety and ease of maintenance,” said fire chief Wayne Price. “The improved outward visibility, lower step-in height and easy access for service are just a few of the features our team was drawn to when evaluating the Dash CF.”

The engine requires little maintenance and when repairs are required, mechanics have better access to its components. For example, changing the pump impellor takes less than three hours – a task that would take several days on older fire trucks.

“Cranbrook is setting a precedence of quality which should result in increased dependability and reduced long term maintenance costs,” said Brian Howe, mechanic with the City of Cranbrook. “This is one of the best built trucks that I have seen in my twenty four years of working with fire apparatus.”

The Dash CF was custom made for Cranbrook Fire and Emergency Services, with large onboard water and foam capabilities that will improve Cranbrook’s initial response to fires in rural areas.

“I am impressed with the exceptional value our community is getting in this new fire engine. Its design and function is 10 years ahead of any other new fire apparatus on the market,” said Dave Lind, Deputy Director of Fire and Emergency Services. “Due to some fortunate timing we were able to purchase the truck without additional costs and today, the same truck would cost significantly more.”

City council approved the $475,000 purchase in September, borrowing $250,000 for the fire truck from the Municipal Finance Authority. Spread over five years, that debt will result in an increase of $1.80 per $100,000 of assessed home value for residential taxpayers.